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Behind the Blue

Some stories require a little more – a little more discussion, more context, more depth and breadth. That’s the idea behind “Behind the Blue” – a weekly podcast created by UK Public Relations and Marketing. It is designed to explore through probing interviews the in-depth the stories that make UK the university for Kentucky and that have impact across the institution, the Commonwealth and, in some cases, the world.
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Now displaying: December, 2018
Dec 27, 2018

LEXINGTON, KY (Dec. 27, 2018) - The world of human genome editing was turned on its head last month when a scientist from China claimed – on YouTube, no less – to have created the first gene-edited babies. He Jiankui, an assistant professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen, announced that he used a gene editing tool called CRISPR on two embryos in hopes of making them resistant to HIV.

With the birth of these twin girls (and an alleged third pregnancy underway), Jiankui flung the theoretical world of gene editing firmly into the middle of a bioethical firestorm, and the fallout from his actions are likely to affect how science is conducted and policed for generations to come. 

The "genes are out of the bottle," says Sara Rosenthal, Ph.D., professor and founding director of the University of Kentucky's Program for Bioethics. "Assuming that [Jiankui] is telling the truth – and we don't even know that yet, since we've seen no data – the implications of his actions for both the science community and for these girls and their offspring are profound."

In this episode of "Behind the Blue," Rosenthal discusses the controversy surrounding Jiankui’s claims and the implications when science gets ahead of ethical principles.

In addition to running UK’s Bioethics Program, Rosenthal also directs UK HealthCare's clinical ethics consultation service and the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science's Research Ethics Consultation Service, also known as "benchside ethics" consults.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Dec 25, 2018

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 25, 2018) – (THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION) Drug addiction is rampant in the nation, with estimates of more than 70,000 people dying from drug overdoses in 2017, much of that fueled by opioid abuse.

To put it in relatable numbers, the United States suffered more deaths to drug abuse last year than the total number of U.S. soldiers killed in the Vietnam War. Or, put another way, at roughly 200 deaths per day, it’s the equivalent of a jumbo jet going down every 24 hours.

The problem has reached epidemic levels in Kentucky, with heroin and fentanyl abuse ravaging communities. On this week’s episode of Behind the Blue, Dr. Sharon Walsh, director of the University of Kentucky’s Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR) and a distinguished professor in the UK College of Medicine, discusses the challenge Kentucky faces in battling the opioid epidemic.

That question – what do we do? – was the basis of a daylong meeting Dr. Walsh had with the UK Board of Trustees. As part of its annual retreat this year, UK President Eli Capilouto and Walsh framed an entire day of discussion and presentations around the opioid epidemic in the country and its specific impact on Kentucky.

As importantly, the discussion centered on how UK – along with partners at the state and federal levels – is positioning itself to stem the tide of drug addiction and abuse in the state and beyond those borders.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Dec 19, 2018

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 19, 2018) – (THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION) The holidays offer the opportunity to reunite with seldom-seen relatives. Family gatherings often bring people together over traditional foods, activities, and recollections of the past. If you notice memory changes in your older family members, how do you know whether what you're seeing is just part of getting older or something more serious? 

According to Kelly Parsons of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky, there's a fine line between normal brain aging and dementia.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue”, Parsons joins us to provide tips on warning signs and what to do when you worry that grandma or grandpa might have Alzheimer's, plus advice on making the holidays less stressful for everyone when someone with Alzheimer's is on the guest list.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Dec 17, 2018

LEXINGTON, KY. (Dec. 17, 2018) - One of the biggest barriers to accessing treatment for substance use disorders can be the time it takes to find an open space in a treatment facility. By the time a clinician, family member or patient can find the right facility for their needs and navigate the insurance process, the bed in question may have been filled or the window of opportunity for recovery may have passed.

During a visit with her own primary care physician, Terry Bunn, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and director of the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC) heard that same sentiment repeated. As the leader of KIPRC, a bona fide agent of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, Bunn knew there was a solution to this issue, that more people with substance use disorders could be helped and lives could be saved.

In February 2018, "Find Help Now KY" was launched. Kentucky is currently the only state with a near real-time treatment opening locator for substance use disorders. The locator guides individuals to available treatment openings. It takes into consideration the substance(s) being used, payment options including commercial and public insurance programs, gender identity, preference for in- or out-patient treatment and needed co-occurring treatments such as mental health care, plus 30 more criteria. The site provides daily availability information for treatment openings, to enable rapid admission to addiction programs.

On this week's episode of "Behind the Blue" hear about the development of "Find Help Now KY", the success the site has experienced and KIPRC's efforts to assist other states in the development of their own website to help those in active addiction.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Dec 10, 2018

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 11, 2018) –In case someone asks you, what do the arts have to do with the sciences, just tell them to spend a few minutes with University of Kentucky senior biology and neuroscience major Esther Putman. She will tell you, plenty.

Raised by parents with a strong commitment to making sure that Esther got to see the importance of being a well-rounded person, she’s been a lifelong student of dance while simultaneously developing a passion for the study of all things space, as in NASA, and medicine.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR‘s Carl Nathe talks with Putman about why UK has been the perfect place for her to put all of her interests together as she works toward what promises to be a fascinating life and career.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Dec 3, 2018

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 3, 2018) – If staying engaged in something you love is the key to staying young, University of Kentucky emeritus faculty member Don Frazier certainly is on the right track.

At an age when many folks are sitting back and taking it easy, Frazier still shows up on campus several days a week to impart knowledge and wisdom to young students, and to mentor up-and-coming faculty members. And he still is earning research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR‘s Carl Nathe talks with Frazier about his passion for science and research, and for sharing that love with others.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

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