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Behind the Blue

Some stories require a little more – a little more discussion, more context, more depth and breadth. That’s the idea behind “Behind the Blue” – a weekly podcast created by UK Public Relations and Marketing. It is designed to explore through probing interviews the in-depth the stories that make UK the university for Kentucky and that have impact across the institution, the Commonwealth and, in some cases, the world.
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Now displaying: 2019
Aug 13, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 13, 2019) - THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION. John Thelin is widely regarded as one of the country’s experts on higher education.

The long-time University of Kentucky professor of higher education and public policy has written what many consider to be the definitive history of American higher education – A History of American Higher Education from Johns Hopkins Press – along with accounts about collegiate sports and university fund-raising efforts.

Now, in his latest book – Going to College in the Sixties, also from Johns Hopkins – Thelin examines both the reality, and sometimes the misperceptions people have about change and evolution of the college experience in the 1960s.

“The change in the mood of American higher education from 1960 to 1969 was incredible and surprising -- from optimism and confidence to exhaustion and uncertainty,” Thelin recently told InsideHigherEducation. “If I were asked for a eulogy or epitaph for the decade, I would note that much of the ’60s happened in the ’70s. The countercultural innovations that took root in the late 1960s continued and grew into the mid-1970s. I also think the cultural legacies surpassed the political changes.”

In this edition of Behind the Blue, UK’s office of Public Relations and Strategic Communications sat down with Thelin to discuss his new book and how UK has evolved, particularly as the institution begins a series of events this year to mark 70 years of integration.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Aug 6, 2019

LEXINGTON, KY. (Aug. 6, 2019) – THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION. One of the biggest barriers to accessing treatment for substance use disorders can be the time it takes to find an open space in a treatment facility. By the time a clinician, family member or patient can find the right facility for their needs and navigate the insurance process, the bed in question may have been filled or the window of opportunity for recovery may have passed.

During a visit with her own primary care physician, Terry Bunn, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and director of the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC) heard that same sentiment repeated. As the leader of KIPRC, a bona fide agent of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, Bunn knew there was a solution to this issue, that more people with substance use disorders could be helped and lives could be saved.

In February 2018, "Find Help Now KY" was launched. Kentucky is currently the only state with a near real-time treatment opening locator for substance use disorders. The locator guides individuals to available treatment openings. It takes into consideration the substance(s) being used, payment options including commercial and public insurance programs, gender identity, preference for in- or out-patient treatment and needed co-occurring treatments such as mental health care, plus 30 more criteria. The site provides daily availability information for treatment openings, to enable rapid admission to addiction programs.

On this week's episode of "Behind the Blue" hear about the development of "Find Help Now KY", the success the site has experienced and KIPRC's efforts to assist other states in the development of their own website to help those in active addiction.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 30, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 31, 2019) – The University of Kentucky is constantly trying to make itself better. An ongoing example is the team effort being applied to enhance sustainability and recycling efforts across the entire campus.

On this episode of ‘Behind the Blue’, Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications sits down with three campus leaders who are achieving outstanding results in these areas. Shane Tedder (UK’s Sustainability Coordinator), Joanna Ashford (UK’s Recycling Coordinator) and Esther Moberly (UK’s Waste, Recycling, and Trucking Manager) discuss how they work together towards the idea of ‘cultural sustainability’, and to keep the University balancing its economic responsibilities with environmental and social ones.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 23, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 23, 2019) – Experts advise that one of the best ways to stay young at heart is to remain curious about the world around you, to keep learning new things. The University of Kentucky’s commitment to this concept is demonstrated by its Office of Lifelong Learning, under the very capable direction of Diana Lockridge.

Thanks to a program envisioned by former UK president Herman Donovan back in the 1950’s and formally begun in 1964, well over 1,000 Kentuckians age 50 and over now take classes, attend special programs, paint, sing, dance and more. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at UK and the Donovan Fellows give credence to their adopted motto, “Where Curiosity Never Retires.” 

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe visits with Lockridge about the dynamic educational and enrichment opportunities offered to older adults through the university.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 16, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 16, 2019) – Regeneration is one of the most enticing areas of biological research. How are some animals able to regrow body parts? Is it possible that humans could do the same? If scientists could unlock the secrets that confer those animals with this remarkable ability, the knowledge could have profound significance in clinical practice down the road.  

Scientists at the University of Kentucky have taken this fantasy one step closer to reality, recently announcing that they have assembled the genome of the axolotl, a salamander whose only native habitat is a lake near Mexico City.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Amy Timoney talks with Randal Voss, a professor in the UK Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, and Jeramiah Smith, an associate professor in the UK Department of Biology. Organisms with larger genomes than humans have been largely impossible to map, due to the remarkable computational burden posed, but Voss and Smith adapted a classical genetic approach called linkage mapping to put the axolotl genome together in the correct order quickly and efficiently – the first genome of this size to be assembled to date.

As proof of concept, Voss and Smith used the assembled data to rapidly identify a gene that causes a heart defect in an axolotl, thus providing a new model of human disease.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 9, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 09, 2019) – For the very first time, the University of Kentucky is  hosting the Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA) program on its campus in Lexington this summer.The three-week intensive summer arts program opened on June 23 and  continues through July 13, with selected high school sophomores and juniors from across the state participating in seminars, masterclasses, lectures, workshops, and more.

UK alumnus Nick Covault, who earned degrees from the College of Fine Arts in vocal performance and arts administration, is also a GSA graduate and is now in his third year as director of the program. GSA enables all of its students to attend free of charge, thanks to a public/private partnership first established in 1987 by The Kentucky Center.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Covault about his own time as a GSA student and how his UK experiences continue to help  influence his life and career.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 2, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 3, 2019) – Alzheimer's disease wreaks emotional havoc on patients, who are robbed of their memories, their dignity, and their lives.  It’s financially devastating as well: care for Alzheimer's patients is predicted to top $1 trillion by about the time children born today are having children of their own.

More than 70,000 Kentuckians are living with Alzheimer's disease, which likely means that you know someone whose life has been touched -- directly or indirectly -- by dementia. And since that number is expected to rise to more than 85,000 in the next five years or so, Alzheimer's will likely hit closer to home for many of us.

But the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging is doggedly pursuing answers to unlock the "how" and "why" dementia occurs with the goal of a treatment by 2050. They are world leaders in dementia research, and research funding for Sanders-Brown has almost tripled in the past 5 years.

In this episode of "Behind the Blue," Sanders-Brown director Linda Van Eldik talks about Sanders-Brown's involvement in some of the most important discoveries in the history of Alzheimer's research and what they are doing now to advance the science. 

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue,” email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jun 25, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 25, 2019) – The University of Kentucky campus in Lexington is a big place, nearly 800 acres in area. Add in hundreds of buildings, ranging in age from brand new to more than 100 years old, and it’s a lot to keep track of and take care of.

Overseeing this effort is the job of UK’s Vice President for Facilities Management and Chief Facilities Officer Mary Vosevich, who joined the UK family in 2014 after a long career at the University of New Mexico.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Vosevich about her responsibilities, the work that her people do each and every day, and the future outlook for the campus.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jun 19, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 19, 2019) – When hospitals close we can assume that those who live near them will presumably have less access to medical care because they will have to travel farther for healthcare services. Since 2009, five rural hospitals in Kentucky have closed, and many more are at risk of following suit. 

Alison Davis, a professor of agricultural economics in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and director of Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky (CEDIK) and SuZanne Troske, a research associate at CEDIK, recently authored a policy paper, and are working on a research article, that discusses the impact rural hospital closures have on the length of time an individual spends being transported in an ambulance.

While the paper didn’t offer specific solutions to the problem, the two researchers plan to conduct further studies to examine air transportation as an alternative, how longer ambulance rides impact health outcomes and understand the importance of hospitals as an economic driver in a community.

In this week’s episode of Behind the Blue, we discuss all this as well as the role communities can play in keeping rural hospitals open, the important piece of healthcare services provided by ambulances and emergency medical services and how economic development can impact health outcomes.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jun 11, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 11, 2019)The University of Kentucky’s Department of Computer Science within the College of Engineering was formed in 1966, making it one of the oldest departments of its kind anywhere in the nation.

Now one of its younger faculty members, Corey Baker, is helping to lead the way for the department in bridging the diversity gap. Baker, who is in his second year as an assistant professor at UK, believes universities must do a better job recruiting, retaining, and graduating minority students in engineering. Thus far, his extensive efforts are proving to be very successful.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Baker about student recruitment and about his teaching, research, and service.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

May 28, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 28, 2019) – Anthropology is the study of human culture in the past and the present. University of Kentucky professor Richard ‘Dick’ Jefferies is now in his fourth decade as a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology, within UK’s College of Arts and Sciences.

In his work of teaching, research, and service, Jefferies, an archaeologist, uncovers objects which shed light on how people in Kentucky and elsewhere lived hundreds and even thousands of years ago. 

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Jefferies about his fascinating career which includes the mentorship of many outstanding students over the years.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

May 20, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 20, 2019) – Just in case you’re thinking, ‘I have a really busy schedule,’ pause for a moment to consider just what University of Kentucky College of Medicine student Lee Kiefer has ‘on her plate. 

A graduate of Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Lexington, Kiefer is trying to qualify for her third consecutive Summer Olympics appearance as a member of Team USA Fencing for 2020. She posted a Top-5 finish at the 2012 Summer Games in London, England and followed that up with a Top-10 finish at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Kiefer, who comes from a family of medical doctors, starred as a collegiate fencer at the University of Notre Dame before entering medical school at UK in the fall of 2017. She recently completed her second year of study ahead of schedule and will be taking a one-year leave of absence in order to compete in high-level meets around the world as she strives to earn a spot at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Kiefer about what it’s like to be an aspiring doctor while chasing her goal of an Olympic medal.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

May 13, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 13, 2019) – Thanks to work spearheaded by University of Kentucky College of Engineering faculty member W. Brent Seales, UK is poised to become the world-class leader in digitally ‘unwrapping’ and restoring one-of-a-kind cultural artifacts, such as ancient manuscripts.

Seales and his students have worked for more than two decades to non-invasively image and unfurl all types of fragile texts, such as Beowulf, the Dead Sea Scrolls and more. Seales, professor and chair of UK’s Department of Computer Science, has earned a reputation as “the man who can read the unreadable.”

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Seales about his fascinating work and how it energizes him and excites those he teaches.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

May 7, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 7, 2019) – On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” Carl Nathe of University of Kentucky Public Relations talks with Agricultural Economics Professor Mike Reed, who also directs the Office of International Agriculture Programs for UK’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

Reed is optimistic about the future of agriculture in this country and globally.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Apr 30, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 30, 2019) – Now in her eighth year on the faculty of the University of Kentucky, Alison Gustafson is very happy to be a Wildcat. Gustafson is  associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition within UK’s  College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. 

Along with her classroom teaching, Gustafson does extensive research and outreach focused on helping people make healthier food choices.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Gustafson about her work to help Kentuckians make real strides in the battle against chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Through the efforts of Gustafson and her colleagues, hopeful signs are appearing on the horizon. 

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Apr 23, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 23, 2019) – The University of Kentucky Alumni Association started the Great Teacher Award program in 1961 to honor excellent teaching at the university. There have been 296 awards given since that first year. Nominations may only be submitted by current students.

To receive the award, a candidate must:

  • Hold the rank of full-time lecturer or above and have been a member of the faculty for the past three years at UK
  • Have superior knowledge of the subject matter
  • Have original and innovative classroom presentations
  • Demonstrate concern for students, both inside and outside the classroom setting
  • Not have been a recipient of the award for the past 10 years

A committee of 17 members of the UK Alumni Association Board of Directors and a representative from the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa select the recipients based on objective rating and ranking of the eligible nominations submitted.

On this episode of Behind the Blue, UKPR’s Amy Jones-Timoney talks with two of the six Great Teacher Award winners for 2019.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue

Apr 16, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 16, 2019) – The University of Kentucky Alumni Association started the Great Teacher Award program in 1961 to honor excellent teaching at the university. There have been 296 awards given since that first year. Nominations may only be submitted by current students.

To receive the award, a candidate must:

  • Hold the rank of full-time lecturer or above and have been a member of the faculty for the past three years at UK
  • Have superior knowledge of the subject matter
  • Have original and innovative classroom presentations
  • Demonstrate concern for students, both inside and outside the classroom setting
  • Not have been a recipient of the award for the past 10 years

A committee of 17 members of the UK Alumni Association Board of Directors and a representative from the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa select the recipients based on objective rating and ranking of the eligible nominations submitted.

On this episode of Behind the Blue, UKPR’s Amy Jones-Timoney talks with two of the six Great Teacher Award winners for 2019.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue

Apr 10, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 10, 2019) – The University of Kentucky Alumni Association started the Great Teacher Award program in 1961 to honor excellent teaching at the university. There have been 296 awards given since that first year. Nominations may only be submitted by current students.

To receive the award, a candidate must:

  • Hold the rank of full-time lecturer or above and have been a member of the faculty for the past three years at UK
  • Have superior knowledge of the subject matter
  • Have original and innovative classroom presentations
  • Demonstrate concern for students, both inside and outside the classroom setting
  • Not have been a recipient of the award for the past 10 years

A committee of 17 members of the UK Alumni Association Board of Directors and a representative from the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa select the recipients based on objective rating and ranking of the eligible nominations submitted.

On this episode of Behind the Blue, UKPR’s Amy Jones-Timoney talks with two of the six Great Teacher Award winners for 2019.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue

Mar 26, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 27, 2019) – The numbers tell a startling and numbing story:

 In 2017, 70,000 Americans lost their lives to drug overdoses – a number that is expected to continue to rise for the near future.

  • The life expectancy of Americans has actually declined each of the last two years, largely driven by deaths resulting from drug addiction and overdoses.
  • Some 2.6 million Americans are addicted to opioids and three-quarters of heroin users first misused prescription opioid drugs.

But there are names, people and stories behind each of those daunting numbers and statistics – the family members, prosecutors, police officers and medical professionals toiling in communities each day to attack the scourge and epidemic of opioid abuse in America.

That story is what journalist and author Beth Macy sought to document in her compelling bestseller, Dopesick. The 2018 book focuses on the impact of opioid addiction in rural America, particularly the communities of Appalachia where Macy has been a journalist for more than 30 years.

“There’s a cavernous space between seeing a person as worthy medical care and seeing them as a criminal and that’s where the opioid crisis was able to grow,” Macy said during a recent lecture at the University of Kentucky.

Macy was the keynote speaker last week at the Fulbright Visiting Scholar Enrichment Seminars, a conference hosted at the University of Kentucky. 

Macy’s book was provided in October to every member of UK’s Board of Trustees as they prepared for their annual retreat, which focused on the university’s efforts in the area of drug and opioid abuse.

UK is home to several nationally recognized researchers and clinicians, who are working across several disciplines, to attack opioid addiction and substance abuse disorder.

On this episode of “Behind the Blue” Macy discusses her book, some of the challenges she sees in addressing this epidemic and her process as a writer.

“Your job is to impose hope and order on a sad and chaotic story,” Macy said.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Mar 18, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 18, 2019) - John Thelin is widely regarded as one of the country’s experts on higher education.

The long-time University of Kentucky professor of higher education and public policy has written what many consider to be the definitive history of American higher education – A History of American Higher Education from Johns Hopkins Press – along with accounts about collegiate sports and university fund-raising efforts. 

Now, in his latest book – Going to College in the Sixties, also from Johns Hopkins – Thelin examines both the reality, and sometimes the misperceptions people have about change and evolution of the college experience in the 1960s.

“The change in the mood of American higher education from 1960 to 1969 was incredible and surprising -- from optimism and confidence to exhaustion and uncertainty,” Thelin recently told InsideHigherEducation. “If I were asked for a eulogy or epitaph for the decade, I would note that much of the ’60s happened in the ’70s. The countercultural innovations that took root in the late 1960s continued and grew into the mid-1970s. I also think the cultural legacies surpassed the political changes.”

In this edition of Behind the Blue, UK’s office of Public Relations and Strategic Communications sat down with Thelin to discuss his new book and how UK has evolved, particularly as the institution recently commemorated Black History Month and begins a series of events this year to mark 70 years of integration.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue

Mar 11, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2019) – The University of Kentucky community is celebrating Women’s History Month. Throughout March, UKNow will feature the women — past and present — on whose shoulders we stand and whose hard work has made our achievements possible. With a combination of fierce resolve and deep compassion, UK women have left indelible marks on our university. Join us as we highlight these #WomenOfUK.

As part of her early graduate work, Karen Clancy, interviewed 10 physicians and staff affiliated with the UK College of Medicine for the school’s fiftieth anniversary. One of her subjects, Dr. Jaqueline Noonan, was the first woman to chair a clinical department for the college. During the interview, Noonan talked about the ways in which women had changed not only the face of medicine, but how it was practiced. 

That conversation led Clancy, a faculty member in the UK College of Health Sciences to ask, “how have women changed medicine?” To date, Clancy has interviewed 25 women who graduated from the UK College of Medicine between 1964 and 1975. She focused on this group because UK began admitting women to medical school in 1960, and she wanted to learn about their experiences prior to the adoption of Title IX.

The “Women in White: Women Physicians Oral History Project” is a collection of oral histories featuring the perspectives and memories of ground-breaking women who completed medical school when only six to 10 percent of physicians were women. They were trailblazers who successfully pursued professional careers, made scientific contributions and brought a new dimension to medicine. They became leaders of medical associations, chairs of academic departments, discoverers, scientists and givers of compassionate and innovative care in their communities. 

They told stories of barriers, triumphs and leadership. Dr. Jacqueline Noonan, a pediatric cardiologist went on to have a medical condition, Noonan Syndrome, named after her. Dr. Flora Johnson came the United States with her sisters when she was just 14 years old. She was told by countless people along her journey that she couldn’t make it in medical school and wouldn’t become a physician, she still practices family medicine in Alhambra, California. Dr. Ardis Hoven, one of the first women to serve as president of the American Medical Association and the first woman elected chair of the World Medical Association said, “Women have a special something that makes them ready to care and to lead. They’ve made medicine more personal, we go the extra mile.”

On this week's episode of "Behind the Blue" you’ll hear these stories and more as we talk with Clancy about her project. The Women in White: Women Physicians Oral History Project is housed in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky.  Support for the collection was funded in part by the Arvle Turner Research Fund and the Kentucky Oral History Commission of the Kentucky Historical Society.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue

Mar 7, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 7, 2019) – What does it mean to plan for not just this year or next year, but for the next five years? 

That’s the innovative idea behind the five-year financial plan known as Our Path Forward. The strategic roadmap is a long-term examination of the revenues UK must generate to meet its mission of education, research, service and care for the Commonwealth and beyond the state’s borders.

In this edition of Behind the Blue, Provost David W. Blackwell and Executive Vice President for Finance and Administration Eric N. Monday discuss Our Path Forward, what it means, and why it’s so critical for UK’s future and that of the entire state.

Monday said the campus had been involved in recent years in an important and engaging conversation around disruption – the idea of how technological and other changes are forcing industries, large and small, into seismic shifts in their basic business models.

“We are in the two markets – higher education and health care – that still have the most disruption in front of them,” Monday said.

Blackwell said the university’s deans – as UK’s academic leaders – have been at the forefront of the discussion around change and disruption.

“We’ve got to look beyond this year, into next year and the next five years to determine what we are going to be about,” Blackwell said. “We need to serve the entire commonwealth.”

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Mar 4, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Mar. 4, 2019) - In the late 1960s, P.G. Peeples made his way to the University of Kentucky from the coal town of Lynch in Eastern Kentucky.

He thought he would be a teacher – studies he focused intently on.

But five decades later, Peeples has been marking some 50 years as President/CEO of the Urban League of Lexington. There, he is known as a national leader in urban redevelopment, training and housing efforts.  

In this edition of Behind the Blue, you can listen to how UK helped prepare him not only to be a teacher, but a community leader across generations in Lexington and beyond. It’s a path he didn’t know he would take at the time, but one that has changed the trajectory of Lexington.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Feb 28, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2019) – Science is all around us — pushing, pulling, exerting opposing forces that keep the universe in balance. The University of Kentucky and featured guest speakers from around the region are gathering once again to take a weeklong look at practical science in casual settings during this year’s Everything is Science (EiS) Festival: Opposites Attract.

Everything is Science: Opposites Attract is a week of paired presentations, lectures and demonstrations that take a closer look at the yin and yang of science. Taking place March 4-8 at participating local restaurants and bars, the festival aims to demonstrate how science is happening all around us and not just in research labs.

On this episode of Behind the Blue, Vincent Venditto, an Assistant Professor in the UK College of Pharmacy, and second year Pharmacy student Jarrod Cremeans talk about the development of the festival, what it means to bring these discussions into such casual settings, and how attendees can get a no-pressure introduction to the everyday science that is happening all around them.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Feb 26, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2019) – Throughout U.S. history, college students have often been catalysts of change. In the 1960s they led sit-ins, rallies, marches and demanded change on their campuses and in their communities. The University of Kentucky’s campus was no different. There were issues on campus, and a group of black students took up the mantle of creating a more inclusive and equitable community.

Jim Embry, a 1974 UK graduate, got involved in civil rights activism at 10 years old as a member of Northern Kentucky CORE. His mother was the chapter president and took him to meetings and picket lines. A fire was lit within him that ignited a life-long passion for social justice. Embry was among the UK students who founded the Black Student Union which presented to President John Oswald a list of demands. From that meeting came a lot of big changes including the integration of the basketball team, the institution of diversity programs, the creation of African American history courses, the banning of the song “Dixie” and rebel flags at athletic events and an end to off-campus housing discrimination.

While serving as the BSU president, Embry fought across Kentucky for social and environmental justice. After attending Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral in Atlanta, he helped to organize the annual Martin Luther King Day march in Lexington. His activism eventually led him to Detroit to work closely with Grace Lee Boggs as the director of the Boggs Center. As director, Embry helped create a vision for the Greening of Detroit and established urban gardens. He continued that work when he returned to Lexington in 2005 and founded Sustainable Communities Network.

Change is rarely linear, it’s often cyclical and the issues faced in the past must be battled again. That sentiment has held true for addressing and combatting discrimination on campus according to current president, Tsage Douglas. Douglas, a junior double-majoring in public health and foreign language and international economics, leads the UK Black Student Union with the same passion and fervor Embry had all those years ago and still has.

Douglas appreciates the changes that have taken place at UK since its founding, since it was integrated and since all those changes took place thanks to Embry. But, she came to UK to help it reach its full potential as an inclusive, affirming and diverse campus community. She, and other current members of the Black Student Union, have their own demands: more transparency, increased recruitment of black faculty and staff, increased financial aid for black students and the creation of a black student advisory council. As of today, the black student advisory council has been established and she and other student leaders are working with administrators on the other three goals.

On this week’s episode of Behind the Blue, Embry and Douglas engage in a thought-provoking discussion about their role as change makers, their leadership of the Black Student Union and their vision for the campus community and beyond.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Seventy years ago, Lyman T. Johnson forced open the doors of the University of Kentucky by becoming the first African-American student. He, along with countless others, opened a door and created a path for us to follow. It’s the idea that anyone -- regardless of who they are, the color of their skin, what they believe, how they identify themselves, or where they are from – can find a place at the University of Kentucky. Yet, our story demands that we acknowledge that progress on this path has not been a straight line. There have been moments where we have, as an institution, not honored our aspirations. Those moments provide a compelling reminder that building a community of belonging is a journey, not a project. This month, as part of Black History Month, we are chronicling the stories of the trailblazers, innovators and champions, who bravely stepped forward or are prodding us ahead today. Their stories speak to us and guide us still.

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