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Behind the Blue

Some stories require a little more – a little more discussion, more context, more depth and breadth. That’s the idea behind “Behind the Blue” – a weekly podcast created by UK Public Relations and Marketing. It is designed to explore through probing interviews the in-depth the stories that make UK the university for Kentucky and that have impact across the institution, the Commonwealth and, in some cases, the world.
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Dec 10, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 10, 2019) – The University of Kentucky strives to provide a caring community which provides its students with a sense of belonging. One of the ways UK accomplishes this is through the services offered through the University Counseling Center. 

Mary Chandler Bolin, director of the center, is widely respected across campus and around the nation for her commitment, expertise, and innovations. She is the recent recipient of a major national award from her peers.

In this edition of the Behind the Blue podcast, Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications talks with Chandler Bolin about the center, the wide arrange of services it offers, and her career.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Dec 3, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 3, 2019) – University of Kentucky alumnus Dr. Aaron Thompson, the President of the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, has conducted listening tours across the Commonwealth over the past year.

The goal is to learn what students, parents, community leaders and employers think on key issues in education.

In short, Thompson hopes to learn how to improve education in the bluegrass state.

To learn more about his findings on the tour, and what the Council will do with that information, ‘Behind the Blue’ talked with Thompson during his visit to UK. On this episode, they discuss his beginnings, his insights and what he hopes to see for the future of education and institutions of higher learning in Kentucky.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Nov 26, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 26, 2019) – This week in the United States we celebrate the national holiday of Thanksgiving, so we thought it would be a good time to take stock of the things we may have in our lives to be thankful for.

To that end, we spent an afternoon in the Gatton Student Center on campus talking with students and staff about that, and also learning about some of their favorite Thanksgiving foods and traditions.

Enjoy this short episode, and we hope that you might also have an opportunity to reflect on things you’re thankful for, as well as traditions that are unique and special for you and yours.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Nov 19, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 19, 2019) – The University of Kentucky is tackling many of Kentucky’s toughest health issues through research aimed at making documented, measured progress.

Among the many ongoing examples of UK’s faculty researchers focusing their skills to combat a major health challenge is Jennifer Havens.

In this edition of the Behind the Blue Podcast, Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications talks with Havens about a project she is leading which is combatting Hepatitis C head on.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Nov 12, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 12, 2019) – The new dean of the University of Kentucky College of Communication & Information came to UK a few months ago from another Southeastern Conference school, the University of Alabama. Her name is Jennifer Greer and she is feeling right at home as a member of the Wildcat family.

Greer is impressed by the strong and committed faculty, and by the talented students she is meeting across the campus.

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Greer about  what brought her to Kentucky, her impressions of Lexington and the Bluegrass State,  and what she sees ahead for her college.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Nov 5, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 5, 2019) – The University of Kentucky is recognizing multiple anniversaries this academic year, including 70 years of integration on campus, 50 years of black studies at UK and 10 years of the UK Office for Institutional Diversity. UK's diversity efforts have also been recognized nationally in recent years by publications like Forbes and INSIGHT Into Diversity, who has named UK a Diversity Champion three years running.

But the work is far from over, and UK Vice President for Institutional Diversity Sonja Feist-Price says UK continues to strive for inclusive excellence.

"Every individual on our campus adds value. Everyone’s voice on our campus must matter," Feist-Price said in a recent blog post. "I am grateful to work on a campus that deeply values and recognizes the significance of diversifying our student body, celebrating our unique backgrounds, and accepting and supporting all individuals as they embrace their authentic selves."

On this week’s episode of "Behind the Blue," UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications sits down with both Feist-Price and Lance Poston, executive director of UK Inclusive Health and Campus Partnerships, to discuss ongoing efforts to make the university a place where everyone feels a sense of belonging.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Oct 29, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 29, 2019) – The University of Kentucky recently welcomed Julian Vasquez (pronounced Vas-Kez) Heilig (pronounced High-ligg) to its family as the new dean of the College of Education. 

Heilig brings a strong research background to the post together with a zest for improving educational opportunities for all students, regardless of their background or socioeconomic status.

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Heilig about what brought him to UK and the important role he sees his college playing not only on campus, but across the entire commonwealth.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Oct 22, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 22, 2019) –University of Kentucky researcher April Young and her team have spent the last two years in Eastern Kentucky communities, working to assess and gather information on substance use in those areas for a project known as Kentucky Communities and Researchers Engaging to Halt the Opioid Epidemic, or CARE2HOPE.

Now with an additional $4.2 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to continue their work, Young and her collaborators will take what they’ve learned in the field and focus the next three years on developing comprehensive approaches to prevent and treat consequences of opioid injection. The new grant brings CARE2HOPE’s total funding to over $5.5 million.

Young, an associate professor of epidemiology in the UK College of Public Health and faculty member of UK’s Center on Drug and Alcohol Research and Center for Health Equity Transformation, grew up in rural Georgia and understands the struggles smaller communities can face in addressing health crises.

On this episode of Behind the Blue, Young talks with UKPR’s Allison Perry about working with a community-based staff, the creative tactics used to build connections and trust, and the complicated layers of challenges these communities face, from unstable housing, food insecurity and more, that require what she terms “wraparound care.”

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university. 

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Oct 15, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 15, 2019) – The University of Kentucky College of Social Work prepares its students for careers of service across a spectrum of important areas touching virtually every segment of our society. Earlier this year, faculty member Jay Miller was named as the college’s new dean. 

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Miller about his vision and hopes for the college as it serves the citizens of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Oct 8, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 8, 2019) – The University of Kentucky Alumni Association is fortunate to have consistently strong leadership from volunteers year in and year out. This 2019-20 academic year is no different as Danville native and proud UK graduate Taunya Phillips brings her passion and dedication to the role of president of the association.

This is Homecoming Week on campus with fun activities abounding for alums and students.

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe interviews Phillips about her love for the Big Blue and Homecoming 2019.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Oct 1, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 1, 2019) – The University of Kentucky recently received an $8.8 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, to establish a Clinical Research Center as part of the Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network (JCOIN) to support research on quality addiction treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) in criminal justice settings nationwide. The awards, totaling an estimated $155 million, will support the multi-year innovation network, including 10 research institutions and two centers that will provide supportive infrastructure.

At UK, the grant will be used to create the Kentucky Women’s Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network (WJCOIN) to enhance access to opioid use disorder treatment for women as they transition from jail back to the community. In Kentucky, women represent the fastest-growing demographic in the criminal justice system and are also susceptible to unique vulnerabilities that can lead to opioid overdose.

Michele Staton, associate professor in the UK College of Medicine Department of Behavioral Science, will serve as principal investigator on the project. Staton will lead a team of experts from across UK’s campus including the colleges of Medicine, NursingPublic Health and Arts & Sciences; the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research; and UK HealthCare’s Kentucky Telecare.

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Allison Perry sits down with Staton, along with Katherine Marks, a UK College of Medicine research assistant professor and project director for the Kentucky Opioid Response Effort within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, and Sarah Johnson, director of addiction services with the Kentucky Department of Corrections, to discuss the partnerships, increases in patient care, and community support this grant will enable in their work.

[Editor’s note: In one response, Johnson mentions that there are 9 correctional facilities across the state participating in the research. She later noted, after the interview, there are actually only 6 participating correctional facilities.]

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Sep 24, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 24, 2019) – For the first time since it was founded more than 40 years ago as a graduate program offering master’s and doctoral degrees, the University of Kentucky’s Martin School of Public Policy and Administration is launching an exciting undergraduate program in the next academic year, 2020-21.

Several of the Martin School’s programs are nationally ranked and the addition of this new initiative has energized its faculty and is already garnering plenty of interest from prospective students.

On this week’s edition of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe interviews Wendell Ford Professor of Public Policy Genia (pronounced Gene – ah) Toma about this undergraduate offering, as well as details on the 2019 Wendell Ford Lecture coming up on Oct. 8th.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Sep 17, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 17, 2019) – Educated at the University of Florida and Yale University, Richard Ausness joined the faculty of the University of Kentucky College of Law 46 years ago, in 1973. Ausness is the Stites and Harbison Professor of Law in the college and is still very active teaching classes and doing legal research.

Lately, Ausness is often contacted by news media outlets across the nation for his  expertise regarding lawsuits stemming from the opioid addiction crisis.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe visits with Ausness to talk about his career at UK and his legal scholarship, including his work dealing with this very serious societal issue.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

 

Sep 10, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 10, 2019) The world of pediatric cancer treatment has seen huge advancements in treatments over the past 60 years – in the 1950s, less than 10 percent of children were cured of their cancer. Today, the number of survivors is nearly 80 percent.

However, that still means that one in five children diagnosed with cancer will not survive. Many childhood cancers can be extremely difficult to treat, and research is key to developing new, better therapies for these diseases. 

Ramon Sun, an assistant professor in the UK Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, is one researcher embarking on an exciting new project in pediatric cancer – specifically, Ewing Sarcoma, a rare pediatric cancer that often occurs in the bones or the soft tissue surrounding bones and affects children and young adults typically between the ages of 5 and 16. Sun was recently awarded a significant grant to study Ewing Sarcoma from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants. The award will fund his work at $110,000 a year for up to the next five years.

With this new grant, Sun will specifically investigate the role of aberrant glycogen in patients with Ewing Sarcoma and explore this glycogen as a therapeutic target. Sun sees the award as not just a coveted accolade, but a chance to identify a potential new cure for Ewing Sarcoma ­– there have been no new therapeutic options approved to treat Ewing Sarcoma in the past 20 years, and patients who undergo chemotherapy and radiation for the disease may experience lifelong side effects from their treatment.

The disease is in desperate need of research and development of new therapeutic options, Sun says, and the St. Baldrick’s grant will further that goal by focusing on a specific angle of the disease – the role of aberrant glycogen in cancer development.

“Ewing sarcoma is a devastating disease, where aggressive treatments are met with poor disease outcomes,” Sun said. “One of the key observations of Ewing Sarcoma made back in the 1930s is the accumulation of a large amount of glycogen – these tumors store a large amount of aberrant glycogen, and that accumulation has gone largely unexplored. My research aims to understand the reason behind this glycogen accumulation and exploit the glycogen deposits as a possible drug target for treating Ewing Sarcoma.”

On this week’s episode of Behind the Blue, UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications' Allison Perry and Kody Kiser sit down with both Sun and UK hematologist/oncologist Dr. John D’Orazio to talk about pediatric cancer in Kentucky, the magic of DanceBlue, future goals for this Ewing Sarcoma project, and why research funding is so important in helping scientists develop newer, better cures for cancer.

"Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Sep 3, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 3, 2019) – Ed Berry became a member of the University of Kentucky football team after graduating from Eminence High School in Henry County, Kentucky just over a decade ago. He earned undergraduate degrees in management and marketing from the Gatton College of Business and Economics in 2013, followed by his MBA from Gatton in 2014.

The roommate of former Wildcat standout Randall Cobb during their college years, Berry did not get the opportunity to join Cobb in pursuing an on-the-field career in the NFL. However, he is harnessing the skills and experience he gained at UK to help the likes of Cobb, Avery Williamson, Aaron Rodgers and other pro football stars make the most of their business opportunities and lives away from football.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe visits with Berry to talk about his formative years, his time at UK and his thriving career as a member of Creative Artists Agency (CAA), based in New York City. 

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Aug 27, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (August 27, 2019) – For the last several months, hundreds of University of Kentucky students, faculty, staff, alums and prospective students and families have been on a process of discovery.

They’ve taken part in interviews and focus groups around the question of what makes the University of Kentucky distinctive?

Some of the results of that discovery process were unveiled recently in what UK marketing and communications professionals call a new “creative brand platform.”

In short, the new campaign – dubbed “Wildly Possible” – seeks a compelling and resonant way to tell the UK story to all those it serves – students, faculty, staff, prospective students and families, policymakers and others.

The idea – through new creative ads, banners, stories, videos and other platforms – is to tell a distinctive story about the way UK challenges and supports everyone who comprises the university community.

To describe that new creative process, and evolution of the UK brand, Behind the Blue talked with Julie Balog, UK’s Chief Marketing Officer, and Jay Blanton, the university’s Chief Communications Officer.

They discuss what the UK brand is, what it means to stakeholders and what they hope to accomplish in this new approach to storytelling about the state’s flagship, land-grant institution.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

Aug 13, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 13, 2019) - THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION. John Thelin is widely regarded as one of the country’s experts on higher education.

The long-time University of Kentucky professor of higher education and public policy has written what many consider to be the definitive history of American higher education – A History of American Higher Education from Johns Hopkins Press – along with accounts about collegiate sports and university fund-raising efforts.

Now, in his latest book – Going to College in the Sixties, also from Johns Hopkins – Thelin examines both the reality, and sometimes the misperceptions people have about change and evolution of the college experience in the 1960s.

“The change in the mood of American higher education from 1960 to 1969 was incredible and surprising -- from optimism and confidence to exhaustion and uncertainty,” Thelin recently told InsideHigherEducation. “If I were asked for a eulogy or epitaph for the decade, I would note that much of the ’60s happened in the ’70s. The countercultural innovations that took root in the late 1960s continued and grew into the mid-1970s. I also think the cultural legacies surpassed the political changes.”

In this edition of Behind the Blue, UK’s office of Public Relations and Strategic Communications sat down with Thelin to discuss his new book and how UK has evolved, particularly as the institution begins a series of events this year to mark 70 years of integration.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Aug 6, 2019

LEXINGTON, KY. (Aug. 6, 2019) – THIS EPISODE IS AN ENCORE EDITION. One of the biggest barriers to accessing treatment for substance use disorders can be the time it takes to find an open space in a treatment facility. By the time a clinician, family member or patient can find the right facility for their needs and navigate the insurance process, the bed in question may have been filled or the window of opportunity for recovery may have passed.

During a visit with her own primary care physician, Terry Bunn, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and director of the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC) heard that same sentiment repeated. As the leader of KIPRC, a bona fide agent of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, Bunn knew there was a solution to this issue, that more people with substance use disorders could be helped and lives could be saved.

In February 2018, "Find Help Now KY" was launched. Kentucky is currently the only state with a near real-time treatment opening locator for substance use disorders. The locator guides individuals to available treatment openings. It takes into consideration the substance(s) being used, payment options including commercial and public insurance programs, gender identity, preference for in- or out-patient treatment and needed co-occurring treatments such as mental health care, plus 30 more criteria. The site provides daily availability information for treatment openings, to enable rapid admission to addiction programs.

On this week's episode of "Behind the Blue" hear about the development of "Find Help Now KY", the success the site has experienced and KIPRC's efforts to assist other states in the development of their own website to help those in active addiction.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 30, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 31, 2019) – The University of Kentucky is constantly trying to make itself better. An ongoing example is the team effort being applied to enhance sustainability and recycling efforts across the entire campus.

On this episode of ‘Behind the Blue’, Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications sits down with three campus leaders who are achieving outstanding results in these areas. Shane Tedder (UK’s Sustainability Coordinator), Joanna Ashford (UK’s Recycling Coordinator) and Esther Moberly (UK’s Waste, Recycling, and Trucking Manager) discuss how they work together towards the idea of ‘cultural sustainability’, and to keep the University balancing its economic responsibilities with environmental and social ones.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 23, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 23, 2019) – Experts advise that one of the best ways to stay young at heart is to remain curious about the world around you, to keep learning new things. The University of Kentucky’s commitment to this concept is demonstrated by its Office of Lifelong Learning, under the very capable direction of Diana Lockridge.

Thanks to a program envisioned by former UK president Herman Donovan back in the 1950’s and formally begun in 1964, well over 1,000 Kentuckians age 50 and over now take classes, attend special programs, paint, sing, dance and more. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at UK and the Donovan Fellows give credence to their adopted motto, “Where Curiosity Never Retires.” 

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe visits with Lockridge about the dynamic educational and enrichment opportunities offered to older adults through the university.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 16, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 16, 2019) – Regeneration is one of the most enticing areas of biological research. How are some animals able to regrow body parts? Is it possible that humans could do the same? If scientists could unlock the secrets that confer those animals with this remarkable ability, the knowledge could have profound significance in clinical practice down the road.  

Scientists at the University of Kentucky have taken this fantasy one step closer to reality, recently announcing that they have assembled the genome of the axolotl, a salamander whose only native habitat is a lake near Mexico City.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Amy Timoney talks with Randal Voss, a professor in the UK Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, and Jeramiah Smith, an associate professor in the UK Department of Biology. Organisms with larger genomes than humans have been largely impossible to map, due to the remarkable computational burden posed, but Voss and Smith adapted a classical genetic approach called linkage mapping to put the axolotl genome together in the correct order quickly and efficiently – the first genome of this size to be assembled to date.

As proof of concept, Voss and Smith used the assembled data to rapidly identify a gene that causes a heart defect in an axolotl, thus providing a new model of human disease.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 9, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 09, 2019) – For the very first time, the University of Kentucky is  hosting the Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA) program on its campus in Lexington this summer.The three-week intensive summer arts program opened on June 23 and  continues through July 13, with selected high school sophomores and juniors from across the state participating in seminars, masterclasses, lectures, workshops, and more.

UK alumnus Nick Covault, who earned degrees from the College of Fine Arts in vocal performance and arts administration, is also a GSA graduate and is now in his third year as director of the program. GSA enables all of its students to attend free of charge, thanks to a public/private partnership first established in 1987 by The Kentucky Center.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Covault about his own time as a GSA student and how his UK experiences continue to help  influence his life and career.

Behind the Blue is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Transcripts are available for download from the host page here. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jul 2, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 3, 2019) – Alzheimer's disease wreaks emotional havoc on patients, who are robbed of their memories, their dignity, and their lives.  It’s financially devastating as well: care for Alzheimer's patients is predicted to top $1 trillion by about the time children born today are having children of their own.

More than 70,000 Kentuckians are living with Alzheimer's disease, which likely means that you know someone whose life has been touched -- directly or indirectly -- by dementia. And since that number is expected to rise to more than 85,000 in the next five years or so, Alzheimer's will likely hit closer to home for many of us.

But the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging is doggedly pursuing answers to unlock the "how" and "why" dementia occurs with the goal of a treatment by 2050. They are world leaders in dementia research, and research funding for Sanders-Brown has almost tripled in the past 5 years.

In this episode of "Behind the Blue," Sanders-Brown director Linda Van Eldik talks about Sanders-Brown's involvement in some of the most important discoveries in the history of Alzheimer's research and what they are doing now to advance the science. 

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue,” email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jun 25, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 25, 2019) – The University of Kentucky campus in Lexington is a big place, nearly 800 acres in area. Add in hundreds of buildings, ranging in age from brand new to more than 100 years old, and it’s a lot to keep track of and take care of.

Overseeing this effort is the job of UK’s Vice President for Facilities Management and Chief Facilities Officer Mary Vosevich, who joined the UK family in 2014 after a long career at the University of New Mexico.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UKPR’s Carl Nathe talks with Vosevich about her responsibilities, the work that her people do each and every day, and the future outlook for the campus.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of “Behind the Blue, “ email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu (mail to: BehindTheBlue@uky.edu) or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

Jun 19, 2019

LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 19, 2019) – When hospitals close we can assume that those who live near them will presumably have less access to medical care because they will have to travel farther for healthcare services. Since 2009, five rural hospitals in Kentucky have closed, and many more are at risk of following suit. 

Alison Davis, a professor of agricultural economics in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and director of Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky (CEDIK) and SuZanne Troske, a research associate at CEDIK, recently authored a policy paper, and are working on a research article, that discusses the impact rural hospital closures have on the length of time an individual spends being transported in an ambulance.

While the paper didn’t offer specific solutions to the problem, the two researchers plan to conduct further studies to examine air transportation as an alternative, how longer ambulance rides impact health outcomes and understand the importance of hospitals as an economic driver in a community.

In this week’s episode of Behind the Blue, we discuss all this as well as the role communities can play in keeping rural hospitals open, the important piece of healthcare services provided by ambulances and emergency medical services and how economic development can impact health outcomes.

Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

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